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The Michigan ACE Initiative is focused on expanding efforts toward awareness of Adverse Childhood Experiences and creating statewide community coalitions to recommend development of appropriate interventions, state policy, and to provide for the implementation of Medicaid policy for ACE.

The MI ACE project has built awareness, introduced community leaders and infrastructure to the core concepts of the study, and built on the support coming from the health and human services sector. Now we are faced with taking that science, the groundswell of interest and the momentum created, and implementing programs across our state that can help to develop trauma informed, healing communities, and begin moving to prevention.

There’s no one approach or one size fits all application that’s going to work. But what we can do is encourage organizations and institutions to examine their existing infrastructures and find creative ways to adapt what they already have to get the job done. The potential of the ACE Study is real. Making the transition to a more healing society will yield tangible results, but only if we can help make it happen across all of our communities, no matter how different they are. It’s a big mission and Michigan is the first place to try to do it statewide. What happens in Michigan will be a roadmap for the rest of the country.

"Since participating in the Michigan ACE Initiative training it seems as though I haven’t had a single experience in which I cannot use my learning. I share what was learned and even better, I can offer training for those who want to know more."

— Zoe Lyons, Jackson County DHHS

"The ACE Master Training was exactly what I needed to help propel us forward as a trauma-informed community. The knowledge, tools and network acquired helps build local capacity to shift the way we support families (and each other) in our community."

— Kathy Szenda Wilson, BC Pulse

"The ACE Master Training provides the tools to share essential information about adverse childhood experiences and its impacts. This kind of knowledge has the power to transform how we understand people and the capacity for change."

— Sarah Shea, PhD, LMSW, Eastern Michigan University School of Social Work